Art by Gabrielle Rose. I live in Oakland, CA. Watercolor and ink are my favorite media. Get in touch at hello@drawgabbydraw.com.
This month draw Gabby draw! turned 5 years old! Here is one of the first drawings I posted, back in February 2009. Five years in internet time is a long time. I guess my style is the same and different. That’s what one would expect, right?
drawgabbydraw:

A Tangle
This month draw Gabby draw! turned 5 years old! Here is one of the first drawings I posted, back in February 2009. Five years in internet time is a long time. I guess my style is the same and different. That’s what one would expect, right?
drawgabbydraw:

A Tangle

This month draw Gabby draw! turned 5 years old! Here is one of the first drawings I posted, back in February 2009. Five years in internet time is a long time. I guess my style is the same and different. That’s what one would expect, right?

drawgabbydraw:

A Tangle

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Painting.

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danistokes asked:
I have a question about the paper you use. Do you paint while the paper is still attached to the block? I bought one and thought that the other papers beneath would get ruined by the water.

Yes, definitely. It being attached to the block is what prevents the paper from warping. Just leave it on until the piece is dry, and then remove it. Watercolor paper is fairly thick, so it shouldn’t bleed through to the sheet below. However, if you are doing a very wet technique, the paper underneath might get a little damp. It will return to normal when it dries. 

I guess there’s a chance that a really cheap block could get ruined, but even with cheaper paper I haven’t had a problem. I think Canson is the cheapest one I buy. 

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what kind of supplies do you recommend for a beginner in water colors?

Prang watercolors are great because you find them practically anywhere, they’re affordable, and for tray watercolors are very good quality (moist, not chalky). For brushes, I’d say start with a large, medium, and small round brush. For paper, find an affordable watercolor block. The paper is adhered on all four sides to prevent warping. When you feel it’s worth it, you can upgrade to pricier paper (like Arches). Those are what I consider the basics. You don’t even need a plastic palette at first because you could mix your colors in the lid of the Prang paint tray!

Here’s a post I did detailing the materials that I use the most. Hope this helps!

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Happy Valentine’s Day!
Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Something reptilian. When I started this I told myself I could only use the brown, blue, and black paint in my tray, and that I could only outline in pencil (no ink). Then I broke a rule and allowed an accent color.

Watercolor, pencil, a teeny bit of colored pencil, on cold-pressed watercolor paper.

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This is the best thing ever. Read on and watch:

doodlersanonymous:

This animation by Denis Chapon is epic. There can be nothing more important for you to do right now than to watch this.

In 2008, with no exact plan in place, Denis just took to doodling on the backside of used paper. He made 12 drawings a day (that equaled one second of animation). And then, each of the following days, he took the last three drawings from the day before and kept on animating. Three years later, that slow accumulation of little bits of effort over time rendered an incredible movie that’s captivating to watch and completely filled with spontaneity.

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It’s rainy here.
It’s rainy here.

It’s rainy here.

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Good morning! It’s February! Just so you know, every order placed in my shop this month will include a hand-painted heart notecard (flat, not folded). It will be the same colors as the one you see above, but probably a different pattern. Still some original drawings for cheap left, too.
Good morning! It’s February! Just so you know, every order placed in my shop this month will include a hand-painted heart notecard (flat, not folded). It will be the same colors as the one you see above, but probably a different pattern. Still some original drawings for cheap left, too.

Good morning! It’s February! Just so you know, every order placed in my shop this month will include a hand-painted heart notecard (flat, not folded). It will be the same colors as the one you see above, but probably a different pattern. Still some original drawings for cheap left, too.

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Arms are overrated! 
Arms are overrated! 

Arms are overrated! 

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My messy-ish corner.
My messy-ish corner.

My messy-ish corner.

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Hi Gabby! Your work is absolutely stunning. I'm majorly in love with watercolours! Am I correct in saying you're self taught? That's really cool. I'm just starting out on my own self taught journey and I am a little lost. I draw a lot, but I lack the structure an education would give me. I was wondering if you had any tips on the best way to go about it?

Hello! Thank you! I am self-taught. Here are my tips (that I don’t even always follow but you know):

Without the structure of a formal education you have to create your own structure in a few ways. The first is making time to practice. When I was a teacher, I would make time in the evenings after grading papers and planning to draw, or on Friday, my day off, I would spend a lot of time drawing. Turn down social invitations sometimes to practice. I did!

By practice I mean make mistakes, drop paint onto wet paper just to see what happens, make something out of it… Do whatever you can think of that will help you understand how watercolor behaves under different circumstances. Practicing could also mean giving yourself “assignments”, like, I don’t know, draw five trees and paint them, or make three watercolor blobs and then draw something on top of them, or make something using only two colors. Setting boundaries helps creativity to flourish.

You also have to do your own research for tips on technique and such. There are tons of watercolor tutorials on the internet, for example. And books in your local library. (I am such a dork and definitely checked out books about drawing and watercoloring from the public library when I was  younger.)

Copy other artists. I know this sounds crazy, but what I mean is copy artwork that you love (my favorite artist to copy was Kay Nielsen) and then KEEP IT TO YOURSELF. That stuff isn’t really meant to be shared. What happens is that you end up absorbing certain elements and then over time they transform into something that’s yours. You also figure out new techniques that might not be what the original artist did but are still cool so it doesn’t matter.

That’s really it. It’s up to you to fill in the blanks. Also you should know I am kind of old and have been “teaching myself” for what suddenly has become several years. Going to art school probably would’ve sped up the process a lot, but that’s not the path my life took, and that’s ok. What I’m saying is if you really love art and drawing and all that, keep at it. Nothing happens overnight. 

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Another drawing in my shop. I have a few originals up for $40 or cheaper!
drawGabbydraw.goodsie.com
Another drawing in my shop. I have a few originals up for $40 or cheaper!
drawGabbydraw.goodsie.com

Another drawing in my shop. I have a few originals up for $40 or cheaper!

drawGabbydraw.goodsie.com

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Done quick! Time to do something grown-up like fold laundry or eat a sandwich.

Winsor & Newton ink, 967 Scarlet.

EDIT: For sale here.

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Doodling.
Doodling.

Doodling.

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